Back to articles


Hope Valley Rotarians's successes Jan-Dec 2011

Charities and deserving groups in such far-flung places as the foothills of the Himalayas, the remote hinterland of Africa and the frontline of war-torn Afghanistan have benefited during the past year from the efforts of Rotarians in the Peak District’s Hope Valley.

Closer to home, they have also backed projects to support youngsters battling cancer and physical disability, the homeless in Sheffield and mountain rescue volunteers in the Derbyshire Peak as well as initiatives to help local students and those providing care services in the Valley.

Altogether, the Hope Valley club has handed out over £13,000 to 15 different charities in the past year and members are planning to donate another £6000 before July. In addition, members have made significant personal donations to Rotary International’s campaign to stamp out polio in those parts of the world where the crippling disease still lingers.

“We are not the largest Rotary club in this part of the world but we do believe in trying to make a difference by living up to Rotary’s principal aim - to put service before self,” said Hope Valley President.

In an end-of-year review, President for 2011/12 Ian reported how the club has backed the Nepal Fishtail project and the Jolie Rider ‘Bikes for Africa’ scheme, provided spectacles for Third World countries and sent shoebox supplies to British troops serving in hotspots like Afghanistan and other military bases overseas.

At regional level, members have supported Weston Park Teenage Cancer Unit, Sheffield Cathedral’s Archer project for the homeless, Whizz Kidz, Edale Mountain Rescue team, Hope Careline for the elderly, and have worked on several initiatives with students at Hope Valley College including Young Chef and Dragons’ Den exercises and mock job interviews.

Ian adds: “However deserving the causes, it would be wrong to think that Rotary life is all about raising money. We have also enjoyed a very successful social programme with our families, friends and like-minded people over a wide area.”

Membership of the Hope Valley Club, which enjoys a reputation as a very friendly organization, is growing but there are still opportunities to join for men and women committed to giving service. Members meet at 7pm most Wednesday evenings at the Grouse Inn, Longshaw.